Tag Archives: San Ysidro

Foreign Invasion at the U.S. Border in San Diego | Apr 29

Central American asylum seekers gather at U.S. border as hundreds cheer them on

|| U-T San Diego

“As they prepared to present themselves at the San Ysidro Port of Entry today, a group of asylum seekers from Central America gathered at the border fence in Playas de Tijuana Sunday morning cheered on by supporters on both sides of the border.

The boisterous gathering grew to hundreds, with some waving Honduran flags, calling out chants, waving bouquets of yellow flags, and some of the younger members climbing to the top of the tall metal bollards. Others sat quietly, clutching infants, wondering what awaits them in U.S. custody.

Reina Isabel Rodriguez, 52, had traveled from El Salvador with her two grandchildren. “I fear that they will separate me from them,” she said.

She is among dozens of the Pueblo Sin Fronteras Caravan seeking asylum from the U.S. government — undeterred by fierce criticism from President Trump.

But some members may have to remain in Tijuana for a while longer before they can be processed by U.S. authorities at the San Ysidro Port of Entry, according to U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Pete Flores, director of field operations in San Diego for the agency, said on Saturday that “depending on port circumstances at the time of arrival, individuals may need to wait in Mexico as CBP officers work to process those already within our facilities.”

The Central Americans would not be the first group to be forced to wait in Mexico. When thousands of Haitians sought entry at San Ysidro in 2016, CBP worked with Mexican officials to accept limited numbers each day so as not to overwhelm the port’s processing capacity.

By foot, bus and train, the caravan participants have been journeying through Mexico since leaving the southern border city of Tapachula on March 25 with the aim of reaching the Tijuana-San Diego border. Most are from Honduras, and tell of gang violence and extortion back home.

On Saturday, as they lingered near the U.S. border at Plaza Viva Tijuana, many appeared weary and ready to move on.

Those expected to ask for asylum are a small percentage of a traveling group that at one point swelled to more than 1,700 members, according to organizers. They said that about 400 caravan participants, many of them women and children, had completed the journey to Tijuana, and some small groups already been surrendering at the San Ysidro Port of Entry in recent days.

David López was among dozens pondering their next move on Saturday afternoon. López, 25, who until recently worked on the staff of an elementary school, said “organized crime and our country’s government” had prompted him to flee the Copan area of Honduras with his wife and their three-year-old daughter.

Mother and child had presented themselves at San Ysidro Port of Entry ten days ago, but López remained behind. He said his wife and their daughter have been released from custody while their asylum claim is under review and are staying with family in South Carolina.”

….Continue reading more @ U-T San Diego

 

Border Patrol Catches Migrants ‘Associated with’ Caravan Crossing Illegally

|| Breitbart

“U.S. Border Patrol reported Saturday that it had apprehended several individuals “associated with the Central American Caravan” who were trying to cross illegally into the country.

While many members of the group reportedly planned to apply for asylum at the San Ysidro point of entry on Sunday, others had tried to enter the U.S. “by climbing over the dilapidated scrap metal border fence” on Friday and Saturday, according to a statement by U.S. Customs and Border Protection Chief Patrol Agent Rodney S. Scott.

“In several of these incidents, children as young as 4-years-old, and in one case a pregnant female, were detected entering the United States illegally through a dark, treacherous canyon that is notorious for human and drug smuggling,” Scott said.”

…..Continue reading more @ Breitbart

 

‘Their Country Is Being Invaded’: Exodus of Venezuelans Overwhelms Northern Brazil

|| New York Times

“PACARAIMA, Brazil — Hundreds turn up each day, many arriving penniless and gaunt as they pass a tattered flag that signals they have reached the border.

Once they cross, many cram into public parks and plazas teeming with makeshift homeless shelters, raising concerns about drugs and crime. The lucky ones sleep in tents and line up for meals provided by soldiers — pregnant women, the disabled and families with young children are often given priority. The less fortunate huddle under tarps that crumple during rainstorms.

The scenes are reminiscent of the waves of desperate migrants who have escaped the wars in Syria and Afghanistan, spurring a backlash in Europe. Yet this is happening in Brazil, where a relentless tide of people fleeing the deepening economic crisis in Venezuela has begun to test the region’s tolerance for immigrants.

This month, the governor of the northern Brazilian state of Roraima sued the federal government, demanding that it close the border with Venezuela and provide additional money for her overburdened education and health systems.

“We’re very fearful this may lead to an economic and social destabilization in our state,” said the governor, Suely Campos. “I’m looking after the needs of Venezuelans to the detriment of Brazilians.”

The tens of thousands of Venezuelans who have found refuge in Brazil in recent years are walking proof of a worsening humanitarian crisis that their government claims does not exist.

They also constitute an exodus that is straining the region’s largely generous and permissive immigration policies. Earlier this month, Trinidad deported more than 80 Venezuelan asylum seekers. In Colombian and Brazilian border communities, local residents have attacked Venezuelans in camps.

During the early months of this year, 5,000 Venezuelans were leaving their homeland each day, according to the United Nations. At that rate, more Venezuelans are leaving home each month than the 125,000 Cuban exiles who fled their homes during the 1980 Mariel boat crisis and transformed South Florida.

If the current rate remains steady, more than 1.8 million Venezuelans could leave by the end of this year, joining the estimated 1.5 million who have fled the economic crisis to rebuild their lives abroad.”

…..Continue reading more @ NYT

 

LAPD Officer Accused of Sneaking Illegal Immigrants Across the Border

|| Townhall

“A Los Angeles police officer has been accused of sneaking in two illegal aliens into the United States earlier this week.

An officer by the name of Mambasse Koulabalo Patara was arrested on federal charges for allegedly violating immigration laws. The officer was apprehended at a U.S. Border Patrol checkpoint in Pine Valley.

The arrest occurred at approximately 12:15 AM on Tuesday, after “Patara drove up to the checkpoint with two male passengers in a 2006 Toyota Corolla.”

Patara told the Border Patrol agents that the two men were U.S. citizens. He informed Border Patrol agents that he was off duty and showed them his badge. Eventually the two men admitted they were illegal aliens. The  two illegal aliens gave conflicting stories. One said they had crossed the border days earlier and simply were hitching a ride from the officer. The other said that he had known Patara for at least 5 years and would often do yard work at his house.

Witnesses were reportedly dumbfounded by the arrest….”

….Continue reading more @ Townhall

Haitians Migrate Streaming North to Enter Obama’s America Illegally | Sep 2016

Immigration appointments renewed for Haitians at San Ysidro – Video

– San Diego Union-Tribune

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“We are having an immigration crisis,” Mexico says.

“After days of waiting in limbo, hundreds of Haitians stranded in Tijuana on Monday lined up at a trailer near the border for appointments to be processed for entry into the United States by U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

A previous appointment process had to be scrapped after authorities discovered an underground market had evolved, said a Mexican official with knowledge of the situation. The appointments were re-opened on Monday under a new system that involves the stamping of a Mexican immigration document.

A total of 930 people were given appointments, said the official, who said he could not give his name because his agency had not authorized him to speak.

Migrant advocates said that hundreds began lining up overnight outside the Desayunador Salesiano Padre Chava, a soup kitchen and shelter near the border. The appointments were being given at a trailer on the shelter’s grounds operated by Mexico’s National Migration Institute.

“We are having an immigration crisis,” said Rosario Lozada Romero, head of a municipal office that offers assistance to migrants, talking to reporters outside the center. “I believe this is the beginning of a situation that is going to become even more difficult.”

….Continue reading more of the informative article and see the eye-opening video @  UT San Diego

– One has to wonder why Mexico let in economic migrants into their country, when they cannot even take care of their own people properly? Now they realize what allowing unlimited migration can bring? A bit late for that. Irresponsible and reckless.

We are witnessing a global meltdown, as one impoverished group invades another. Compounding cultural and economic problems, Mexicans generally don’t speak French and the Haitians don’t speak Spanish. They can’t even communicate at the most basic levels./CJ

 

 

U.S. to Step Up Deportations of Haitians Amid Surge at Border

– NY Times

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Obama Effectively has had an Open Border for Haitians for Six Years – Since 2010 Earthquake

“The Obama administration, responding to an extraordinary wave of Haitian migrants seeking to enter the United States, said on Thursday that it would fully resume deportations of undocumented Haitian immigrants.

After an earthquake devastated parts of Haiti in 2010, the United States suspended deportations, saying that sending Haitians back to the country at a time of great instability would put their lives at risk. About a year later, officials partly resumed deportations, focusing on people convicted of serious crimes or those considered a threat to national security.

But since last spring, thousands of Haitian migrants who had moved to Brazil in search of work have been streaming north, mostly by land, winding up at American border crossings that lead to Southern California.

Few have arrived with American visas, but nearly all have been allowed to enter the United States because immigration officials were prohibited, under the modified deportation policy, from using the so-called fast-track removal process often employed at the border for new, undocumented arrivals.

Instead, the migrants were placed in a slower deportation process and released, with an appointment to appear in immigration court at a later date, officials said. Since early summer, most have been given permission to remain in the country for as long as three years under a humanitarian parole provision, immigrant advocates said.

With the full resumption of deportations, which took effect on Thursday morning, Haitians who arrive at the border without visas will be put into expedited removal proceedings.

Jeh Johnson, the secretary of Homeland Security, said in a statement that conditions in Haiti had “improved sufficiently to permit the U.S. government to remove Haitian nationals on a more regular basis.”

While Mr. Johnson’s statement did not mention the recent influx of Haitians along the southwestern border, Homeland Security officials, during a conference call with reporters, cited the migrant wave as the other major factor in the administration’s decision.

Since last October, officials said, more than 5,000 Haitians without visas have shown up at the San Ysidro crossing that links Tijuana, Mexico, with San Diego. By comparison, 339 Haitians without visas arrived at the San Ysidro crossing in the 2015 fiscal year.

An additional 4,000 to 6,000 Haitians were thought to be making their way from Brazil, immigrant advocates in San Diego and Tijuana said, based on estimates from shelters along the Brazil-to-Mexico migration route.”

….Continue reading more @ NY Times

Question: Do we have the capability to vett these asylum seekers? Do we have the resources?

Like anything else, if we cannot afford the cost to properly vett these people, we cannot afford it. We have no obligation to accept people coming through Mexico, claiming any sort of refugee status. It is Mexico’s problem now./CJ