Tag Archives: Nuclear Waste

Power Goes Out At San Onofre Nuclear Plant || Jan 31 2020

Power outage hit San Onofre nuclear plant on Wednesday || OC Register

 

 

Backup systems worked to continue cooling spent fuel, officials said
Electricity is essential to circulate water around the hot waste in San Onofre’s spent fuel pools

“Backup generators rumbled to life at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station on Wednesday, Jan. 29, when an issue with transmission lines feeding the plant caused a 44-minute power outage, operator Southern California Edison said.

Electricity is essential to circulate water around the hot waste in San Onofre’s spent fuel pools — one of the reasons officials are eager to move all waste into dry storage as soon as possible. Dry storage requires no electricity. All waste is slated to be in dry storage later this year.

Power, perhaps provided by plant part-owner San Diego Gas & Electric, cut out at 5:05 p.m. and was restored by 6 p.m., said Edison spokesman John Dobken. Workers followed procedures and were continuing to restore plant systems into the night.

Diesel generators and other equipment responded as designed “and at no time was there any public impact,” said Edison in a statement.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission office was notified. The cause of the outage is still being investigated.”

…read more at: OC Register

 

 

No Nuke Clean up at San Onofre Until 2049 |  Mar 2016

Tensions rise over the storage of spent San Onofre nuclear fuel

– OC Register

FILE - In this June 30, 2011, file photo, beach-goers walk on the sand near the San Onofre nuclear power plant in San Clemente, Calif. The plant was shut down in 2012. Closed nuclear reactors are dipping into funds set aside for their eventual dismantling to build waste storage on-site, raising questions about whether there will be enough money when the time comes. (AP Photo, Lenny Ignelzi, File)
FILE – In this June 30, 2011, file photo, beach-goers walk on the sand near the San Onofre nuclear power plant in San Clemente, Calif. The plant was shut down in 2012. Closed nuclear reactors are dipping into funds set aside for their eventual dismantling to build waste storage on-site, raising questions about whether there will be enough money when the time comes. (AP Photo, Lenny Ignelzi, File)

“Tempers flared at an Oceanside public meeting as speakers demanded that Southern California Edison remove tons of nuclear waste from a beachside bluff at the shuttered San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station – even though the utility essentially is blocked from doing so by federal regulations.

“This nuclear waste, at this site, is as vulnerable a target as you could possibly have for terrorists,” said Michael Aguirre, a San Diego consumer attorney who’s suing the state over the issue. “Edison should take responsibility for the nuclear waste that it produced from which it derived billions of dollars of income.”

Many audience members at Thursday’s meeting on the plant’s decommissioning echoed those sentiments, bemoaning the California Coastal Commission’s approval of a “concrete monolith” to house spent fuel in temporary, dry-cask storage at the site. The contained radioactive material is expected to remain in place until 2049.

Edison – and the nation’s other nuclear power plant operators – contracted with the U.S. Department of Energy in the early 1980s for the removal and permanent disposal of nuclear waste. The federal government agreed to start accepting waste from commercial reactors by 1998 at the latest, in exchange for about $750 million a year in payments from ratepayers who used electricity from nuclear plants.

But after collecting more than $41 billion in the Nuclear Waste Fund, no radioactive waste had been removed under the program. A judge ordered the Department of Energy to stop collecting the fee in 2014.

David Victor, who chairs the San Onofre Community Engagement Panel, which held Thursday’s meeting, said critics of the current plan to store waste at the plant south of San Clemente should direct their demands at officials who can make a difference.

“It’s crucial to get support in Congress,” Victor said. “And in addition to talking to members of Congress, support from local agencies is crucial. The official resolutions from cities like San Clemente and Oceanside, asking the federal government to act, are very, very important.”

The Department of Energy can begin planning for new, temporary storage sites, he said. But Congress ultimately will have to take action to ensure the facilities are completed and can accept radioactive waste, because private companies are concerned about liability, he said.

Two bills in Congress address temporary storage: SB854 and HR3643. Interested individuals should make sure their representatives are focusing on the issue, Victor said.”

…Continue reading @ Orange County Register